• SAINT-FOND, Faujas de (1743-1819).  Descriptions des Expériences de la Machine Aérostatique de... Image
  • SAINT-FOND, Faujas de (1743-1819).  Descriptions des Expériences de la Machine Aérostatique de... Image
  • SAINT-FOND, Faujas de (1743-1819).  Descriptions des Expériences de la Machine Aérostatique de... Image
  • SAINT-FOND, Faujas de (1743-1819).  Descriptions des Expériences de la Machine Aérostatique de... Image
  • SAINT-FOND, Faujas de (1743-1819).  Descriptions des Expériences de la Machine Aérostatique de... Image

Lot 965

SAINT-FOND, Faujas de (1743-1819). Descriptions des Expériences de la Machine Aérostatique de...

SAINT-FOND, Faujas de (1743-1819). Descriptions des Expériences de la Machine Aérostatique de MM. de Montgolfier. Paris: Cuchet, 1783 [With:] - Premiere Suite de la Description des Expériences Aérostatique de MM. Montgolfier. Tome Second. Paris: Cuchet, 1784. 2 volumes, 8vo (196 x 120mm). Vol I: engraved frontispiece and 8 plates, folding table, with the 4-page supplement; vol. II: engraved frontispiece and 4 plates, errata leaf. Contemporary speckled calf, spines gilt with raised bands and red and green morocco lettering-pieces. Provenance: "L.H." (bookplate with motto "Opima Spolia"). FIRST EDITION, second issue of the first volume; FIRST EDITION of the second volume. A FINE COPY OF THE EARLIEST ACCOUNT OF THE FIRST AERIAL VOYAGE. Etienne and Joseph Montgolfier were pioneers in the field of aerostatics and made history in October 1783 when Étienne Montgolfier was the first human to lift off the Earth, making a tethered test-flight from the yard of the Réveillon workshop in the Faubourg Saint-Antoine. Later on the same day, physicist Pilâtre de Rozier became the second to ascend into the air, to an altitude of 24 m (80 feet), which was the full extent of the tether. On 21 November 1783, the first free flight by humans was made by Pilâtre de Rozier, together with an army officer, the marquis d' Arlandes. The balloon flew from the grounds of the Château de la Muette to the Bois de Boulogne, a distance of about 9 kilometers at a height of 910 m (3,000 feet). The author of the account, Saint-Fond, a notable French geologist, was the Montgolfiers' financier and supporter. Norman 769; PMM 229: "... the first serious treatise on aerostation as a practical possibility." (2)